Coverart for item
The Resource For our Navajo people : Diné letters, speeches & petitions, 1900-1960, edited by Peter Iverson ; photo editor, Monty Roessel

For our Navajo people : Diné letters, speeches & petitions, 1900-1960, edited by Peter Iverson ; photo editor, Monty Roessel

Label
For our Navajo people : Diné letters, speeches & petitions, 1900-1960
Title
For our Navajo people
Title remainder
Diné letters, speeches & petitions, 1900-1960
Statement of responsibility
edited by Peter Iverson ; photo editor, Monty Roessel
Contributor
Editor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Collects one hundred documents - letters, speeches, and petitions - written by Diné men, women, and children, and almost all previously unpublished, provide a unique portrait of the Diné during an era (1900-1960) in which they were fighting to defend their lands and to build the Navajo Nation
Cataloging source
DLC
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
index present
LC call number
E99.N3
LC item number
F59 2002
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Label
For our Navajo people : Diné letters, speeches & petitions, 1900-1960, edited by Peter Iverson ; photo editor, Monty Roessel
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 267-269) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 5
  • 78
  • 31.
  • Yanapah Tsosie and Sam Ahkeah (San Juan School) report on a visitor's speech, June 1910
  • 79
  • 32.
  • Lilly Julian (Sherman Institute) and Katherine Atencia (Albuquerque Indian School) describe life at school in 1914
  • 80
  • 33.
  • Alice Becenti (Sherman Institute) writes about homesickness, money, and other concerns, August 24, 1914; November 3, 1915; May 1916
  • 82
  • 3.
  • 34.
  • Grace Padilla (Sherman Institute) asks when she can come home, June 24, 1914; July 19, 1914
  • 85
  • 35.
  • Gertrude Lynch (St. Michaels School) presents her summer plans, April 19, 1915
  • 87
  • 36.
  • John Charles (Haskell Institute) wonders about his future, November 30, 1915
  • 88
  • 37.
  • Tribal Council members consider land use issues, July 8, 1926
  • Chee Dodge calls on the government not to use force in sending children to school, April 20, 1925
  • 90
  • 38.
  • Waldo Emerson (Fort Wingate) clarifies why he may not continue to stay in school, November 10, 1935
  • 91
  • 39.
  • Sally Kinlichini asks that her son return home and Lucy Harvey explains why her children are not in school, November 26, 1935, and March 1938
  • 92
  • 40.
  • Alice Clark invites the director of Navajo education to Toadlena School, May 17, 1940
  • 6
  • 93
  • 41.
  • Sam Gorman speaks about the value of a good education, February 2, 1941, and November 4, 1953
  • 94
  • 42.
  • Chee Dodge summarizes the changes in Navajo perspectives about education, May 20, 1946
  • 99
  • 43.
  • Roger Davis calls for compulsory education, February 18, 1947
  • 101
  • 4.
  • 44.
  • Lilly Neil explains the situation in the checkerboard area, September 8, 1947
  • 103
  • 45.
  • Hoskie Cronemeyer advocates an emphasis on English in the schools, August 11, 1952
  • 106
  • 46.
  • Sam Ahkeah emphasizes the importance of higher education, July 20, 1953
  • 108
  • 47.
  • Jacob C. Morgan opposes using the Navajo oil fund to purchase new reservation lands, February 18, 1927
  • Alice John Bedoni (Phoenix Indian School) stresses the value of education, June 1, 1954
  • 108
  • 48.
  • Dillon Platero reviews current problems, needs, and accomplishments, January 25, 1960
  • 110
  • Chapter 4
  • Rights
  • 121
  • 49.
  • Peshlakai and other leaders support the federal government, November 29, 1908
  • 8
  • 122
  • 50.
  • Be-zho-she describes a confrontation with Superintendent William Shelton, November 1, 1913
  • 123
  • 51.
  • John Yazza and Willie George write from prison, June 24, 1916, and July 8, 1922
  • 128
  • 52.
  • Nelson Etcitty chastises Superintendent Samuel Stacher, April 4, 1922, and April 21, 1922
  • 129
  • 5.
  • 53.
  • Howard Gorman speaks out about the traders, December 20, 1939 and July 2, 1940
  • 132
  • 54.
  • Roger Davis calls for the Navajos to receive the same kind of benefits as non-Indian farmers and ranchers, June 6, 1940
  • 135
  • 55.
  • The Navajo Rights Association approves by-laws and resolutions, October and November, 1940
  • 137
  • 56.
  • John H. Lee protests a decision denying him access to grazing lands, October 11, 1936
  • Deshna Clah Cheschillige advocates Navajo rights, December 8, 1940
  • 142
  • 57.
  • Private Ralph Anderson demands the right to vote, April 30, 1943
  • 144
  • 58.
  • Evans Holly, Jack Jones, James Oliver, and Sam Capitan document some of the challenges facing the Native American Church, August 29, 1944, April 15, 1945, and May 8, 1945
  • 145
  • 59.
  • Julia Denetclaw tries in vain to register to vote, May 6, 1946
  • 11
  • 148
  • 60.
  • Annie Wauneka raises questions about the status of Navajo water rights, May 3, 1952
  • 148
  • 61.
  • Frank Bradley reveals the problems experienced by Navajos working off the reservation, November 3, 1953
  • 150
  • 62.
  • Annie Wauneka addresses health care, November 2, 1953, October 12, 1955, and January 15, 1959
  • 152
  • Chapter 1
  • 6.
  • 63.
  • Howard Gorman discusses the need for legal assistance for individual Navajos, October 9, 1958
  • 158
  • Chapter 5
  • Government
  • 160
  • 64.
  • Atsidi Nez calls for one boss for all of the Navajos, December 31, 1920
  • 161
  • 65.
  • Adolph Maloney favors one version of livestock reduction, August 9, 1937
  • Jacob C. Morgan declares Chee Dodge and his friends are trying to force him off the tribal council, May 20, 1927
  • 162
  • 66.
  • Deshna Clah Cheschillige speaks about the needs of the people, June 1, 1933
  • 164
  • 67.
  • Tom Dodge says the Tribal Council must deal with traders, soil erosion, and missionaries, October 30, 1933
  • 166
  • 68.
  • Jacob C. Morgan employs the example of Booker T. Washington, March 12, 1934
  • 13
  • 169
  • 69.
  • Jim Shirley complains about administrators taking too much of the Tribal Council's time, April 9, 1934
  • 171
  • 70.
  • Chee Dodge recommends the removal of Superintendent E.R. Fryer, April 20, 1936
  • 172
  • 71.
  • Tom Dodge resigns as chairman of the Tribal Council, May 7, 1936
  • 175
  • 7.
  • 72.
  • Tom Dodge characterizes Jacob Morgan as the Navajo Hitler, March 24, 1938
  • 177
  • 73.
  • Jacob C. Morgan articulates his hopes for his administration, November 8, 1938
  • 179
  • 74.
  • Jacob C. Morgan addresses the role of the Tribal Council, March 7, 1939
  • 181
  • 75.
  • Chee Dodge notes the challenges and problems inherent in the use of land resources, April 20, 1938
  • Chairman Jacob C
  • 14
  • 8.
  • Navajo Tribal Council members question Superintendent Fryer about the details of livestock reduction, May 15, 1939
  • 15
  • 9.
  • Land
  • Scott Preston and others write to their congressional representative about current federal grazing policies, February 14, 1940
  • 22
  • 10.
  • Manuel Denetso criticizes the imposition of land management districts, July 5, 1940
  • 24
  • 11.
  • Paul Jones reports that Hopis are taking wood from Navajo land, January 13, 1944
  • 28
  • 12.
  • Deshna Clah Cheschillige emphasizes the importance of developing "our country," July 19, 1944
  • 3
  • 28
  • 13.
  • Mrs. Chiquito fears she will lose her land, May 17, 1947
  • 29
  • 14.
  • Tom Jones, Rachel Laughter, and others describe the "Big Snow," January 1, 1948
  • 30
  • 15.
  • Dewey Etsitty attacks the donkey and praises the elephant, April 18, 1953
  • 32
  • 1.
  • 16.
  • Marcus Kanuho and Sevier Vaughn review Navajo-Hopi relations, December 8, 1954
  • 33
  • 17.
  • Paul Jones advocates getting "our money's worth on oil" and explains that industry can help the Tribe provide for the needy, October 6, 1955, and January 18, 1956
  • 37
  • 18.
  • Gray Valentine looks at contemporary oil development and remembers past promises, January 19, 1956
  • 39
  • Chapter 2
  • Chee Dodge addresses the problems that would occur with the end of trust status and the division of tribal lands, February 2, 1914
  • Community
  • 49
  • 19.
  • St. Michaels residents petition to the President to add land to the reservation, February 26, 1924
  • 50
  • 20.
  • Greasewood chapter officers ask for a boarding school and Round Rock chapter asks for a day school, April 14, 1932 and March 20, 1939
  • 52
  • 21.
  • Shonto and Lukachukai residents let the Commissioner of Indian Affairs know they need better roads, June 15, 1935 and February 1937
  • 4
  • 54
  • 22.
  • Toadlena chapter officers inform Dr. W.W. Peter that a physician is needed in their community, January 30, 1937
  • 56
  • 23.
  • Kinlichee chapter members request that their Christmas wish be granted, December 25, 1937
  • 57
  • 24.
  • Eastern Navajo area residents doubt the author of the Taylor Grazing Act knows anything about them, n.d.
  • 58
  • 2.
  • 25.
  • Lake Valley Chapter members demand their teacher be fired, July 26, 1940
  • 61
  • 26.
  • Rock Point residents protest the transfer of a range rider, November 18, 1940
  • 63
  • 27.
  • Mariano Lake chapter members present a problem with horses, October 26, 1943
  • 64
  • 28.
  • Chee Dodge writes to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs about Navajo oil resources, March 2, 1923
  • Twin Lakes residents call for the end of the Mexican Springs soil conservation station, November 22, 1943
  • 66
  • 29.
  • Many Farms chapter members argue for the end of livestock reduction until the war is over, November 23, 1943
  • 67
  • Chapter 3
  • Education
  • 77
  • 30.
  • Jacob C. Morgan (Hampton Institute) reports his activities, August 27, 1902
  • 78.
  • Howard Gorman reports to E.R. Fryer on Tom Dodge and Chee Dodge, January 28, 1941
  • 188
  • 79.
  • Robert Martin and other Tribal Council members provide Congress with a list of grievances, April 1946
  • 193
  • 80.
  • Dewey Etsitty and Roger Davis argue the traders must pay more rent, June 26, 1948
  • 195
  • 81.
  • Morgan denies the right of Vice Chairman Howard Gorman to speak during a Tribal Council meeting, May, 15, 1939
  • Ned Hatathli urges the Tribal Council to plan for the future, October 14, 1955
  • 198
  • 82.
  • Annie Wauneka analyzes the job being done by the general counsel, January 23, 1956
  • 200
  • 83.
  • Howard Gorman clarifies the significance of Williams v. Lee, January 13, 1959
  • 202
  • Chapter 6
  • Identity
  • 184
  • 212
  • 84.
  • Chee Dodge warns people about a short rope, November 16, 1905
  • 213
  • 85.
  • Clitso D. Dedman seeks Lorenzo Hubbell's advice, September 9, 1912
  • 214
  • 86.
  • Gehbah Manuelito and Ed Becenti disapprove of Navajo ceremonies, August 18, 1929
  • 214
  • 76.
  • 87.
  • Toadlena schoolchildren explain how a rug is created, how sheep are cared for, and how a hogan is constructed, ca. 1930
  • 216
  • 88.
  • Tom Dodge refutes an inaccurate magazine article about the Navajos, February 25, 1933
  • 219
  • 89.
  • Roy Kinsel, Mattie Denet Dale, John Harvey, Hola Tso, Scott Preston, and David Clark furnish conflicting testimony about peyote, May 9, 1940, and May 15, 1946
  • 222
  • 90.
  • Tsehe Notah talks about the need to plan for our own people, July 5, 1940
  • Navajo Code Talkers use their language and imagination, 1942-1945
  • 230
  • 91.
  • Private Ralph W. Anderson asks for support during World War II, July 3, 1943
  • 233
  • 92.
  • Dan Keyonie reminds John Collier that Navajos are fighting for him, July 10, 1943
  • 234
  • 93.
  • Sam Ahkeah lauds the sacrifices of Navajo soldiers and calls for an end to livestock reduction and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, July 9, 1943
  • 185
  • 235
  • 77.
  • Notah Begay supports a range rider, November 19, 1940
  • 187
Control code
49627634
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
xviii, 275 pages
Isbn
9780826327178
Lccn
2002005684
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Note
Library's copy 1-2 (SW Writers): Purchased, 2015 (Access. No. 2015-026). Forms part of: Marc Simmons Library. With dust jacket.
Other physical details
illustrations, map
System control number
(OCoLC)49627634
Label
For our Navajo people : Diné letters, speeches & petitions, 1900-1960, edited by Peter Iverson ; photo editor, Monty Roessel
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 267-269) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 5
  • 78
  • 31.
  • Yanapah Tsosie and Sam Ahkeah (San Juan School) report on a visitor's speech, June 1910
  • 79
  • 32.
  • Lilly Julian (Sherman Institute) and Katherine Atencia (Albuquerque Indian School) describe life at school in 1914
  • 80
  • 33.
  • Alice Becenti (Sherman Institute) writes about homesickness, money, and other concerns, August 24, 1914; November 3, 1915; May 1916
  • 82
  • 3.
  • 34.
  • Grace Padilla (Sherman Institute) asks when she can come home, June 24, 1914; July 19, 1914
  • 85
  • 35.
  • Gertrude Lynch (St. Michaels School) presents her summer plans, April 19, 1915
  • 87
  • 36.
  • John Charles (Haskell Institute) wonders about his future, November 30, 1915
  • 88
  • 37.
  • Tribal Council members consider land use issues, July 8, 1926
  • Chee Dodge calls on the government not to use force in sending children to school, April 20, 1925
  • 90
  • 38.
  • Waldo Emerson (Fort Wingate) clarifies why he may not continue to stay in school, November 10, 1935
  • 91
  • 39.
  • Sally Kinlichini asks that her son return home and Lucy Harvey explains why her children are not in school, November 26, 1935, and March 1938
  • 92
  • 40.
  • Alice Clark invites the director of Navajo education to Toadlena School, May 17, 1940
  • 6
  • 93
  • 41.
  • Sam Gorman speaks about the value of a good education, February 2, 1941, and November 4, 1953
  • 94
  • 42.
  • Chee Dodge summarizes the changes in Navajo perspectives about education, May 20, 1946
  • 99
  • 43.
  • Roger Davis calls for compulsory education, February 18, 1947
  • 101
  • 4.
  • 44.
  • Lilly Neil explains the situation in the checkerboard area, September 8, 1947
  • 103
  • 45.
  • Hoskie Cronemeyer advocates an emphasis on English in the schools, August 11, 1952
  • 106
  • 46.
  • Sam Ahkeah emphasizes the importance of higher education, July 20, 1953
  • 108
  • 47.
  • Jacob C. Morgan opposes using the Navajo oil fund to purchase new reservation lands, February 18, 1927
  • Alice John Bedoni (Phoenix Indian School) stresses the value of education, June 1, 1954
  • 108
  • 48.
  • Dillon Platero reviews current problems, needs, and accomplishments, January 25, 1960
  • 110
  • Chapter 4
  • Rights
  • 121
  • 49.
  • Peshlakai and other leaders support the federal government, November 29, 1908
  • 8
  • 122
  • 50.
  • Be-zho-she describes a confrontation with Superintendent William Shelton, November 1, 1913
  • 123
  • 51.
  • John Yazza and Willie George write from prison, June 24, 1916, and July 8, 1922
  • 128
  • 52.
  • Nelson Etcitty chastises Superintendent Samuel Stacher, April 4, 1922, and April 21, 1922
  • 129
  • 5.
  • 53.
  • Howard Gorman speaks out about the traders, December 20, 1939 and July 2, 1940
  • 132
  • 54.
  • Roger Davis calls for the Navajos to receive the same kind of benefits as non-Indian farmers and ranchers, June 6, 1940
  • 135
  • 55.
  • The Navajo Rights Association approves by-laws and resolutions, October and November, 1940
  • 137
  • 56.
  • John H. Lee protests a decision denying him access to grazing lands, October 11, 1936
  • Deshna Clah Cheschillige advocates Navajo rights, December 8, 1940
  • 142
  • 57.
  • Private Ralph Anderson demands the right to vote, April 30, 1943
  • 144
  • 58.
  • Evans Holly, Jack Jones, James Oliver, and Sam Capitan document some of the challenges facing the Native American Church, August 29, 1944, April 15, 1945, and May 8, 1945
  • 145
  • 59.
  • Julia Denetclaw tries in vain to register to vote, May 6, 1946
  • 11
  • 148
  • 60.
  • Annie Wauneka raises questions about the status of Navajo water rights, May 3, 1952
  • 148
  • 61.
  • Frank Bradley reveals the problems experienced by Navajos working off the reservation, November 3, 1953
  • 150
  • 62.
  • Annie Wauneka addresses health care, November 2, 1953, October 12, 1955, and January 15, 1959
  • 152
  • Chapter 1
  • 6.
  • 63.
  • Howard Gorman discusses the need for legal assistance for individual Navajos, October 9, 1958
  • 158
  • Chapter 5
  • Government
  • 160
  • 64.
  • Atsidi Nez calls for one boss for all of the Navajos, December 31, 1920
  • 161
  • 65.
  • Adolph Maloney favors one version of livestock reduction, August 9, 1937
  • Jacob C. Morgan declares Chee Dodge and his friends are trying to force him off the tribal council, May 20, 1927
  • 162
  • 66.
  • Deshna Clah Cheschillige speaks about the needs of the people, June 1, 1933
  • 164
  • 67.
  • Tom Dodge says the Tribal Council must deal with traders, soil erosion, and missionaries, October 30, 1933
  • 166
  • 68.
  • Jacob C. Morgan employs the example of Booker T. Washington, March 12, 1934
  • 13
  • 169
  • 69.
  • Jim Shirley complains about administrators taking too much of the Tribal Council's time, April 9, 1934
  • 171
  • 70.
  • Chee Dodge recommends the removal of Superintendent E.R. Fryer, April 20, 1936
  • 172
  • 71.
  • Tom Dodge resigns as chairman of the Tribal Council, May 7, 1936
  • 175
  • 7.
  • 72.
  • Tom Dodge characterizes Jacob Morgan as the Navajo Hitler, March 24, 1938
  • 177
  • 73.
  • Jacob C. Morgan articulates his hopes for his administration, November 8, 1938
  • 179
  • 74.
  • Jacob C. Morgan addresses the role of the Tribal Council, March 7, 1939
  • 181
  • 75.
  • Chee Dodge notes the challenges and problems inherent in the use of land resources, April 20, 1938
  • Chairman Jacob C
  • 14
  • 8.
  • Navajo Tribal Council members question Superintendent Fryer about the details of livestock reduction, May 15, 1939
  • 15
  • 9.
  • Land
  • Scott Preston and others write to their congressional representative about current federal grazing policies, February 14, 1940
  • 22
  • 10.
  • Manuel Denetso criticizes the imposition of land management districts, July 5, 1940
  • 24
  • 11.
  • Paul Jones reports that Hopis are taking wood from Navajo land, January 13, 1944
  • 28
  • 12.
  • Deshna Clah Cheschillige emphasizes the importance of developing "our country," July 19, 1944
  • 3
  • 28
  • 13.
  • Mrs. Chiquito fears she will lose her land, May 17, 1947
  • 29
  • 14.
  • Tom Jones, Rachel Laughter, and others describe the "Big Snow," January 1, 1948
  • 30
  • 15.
  • Dewey Etsitty attacks the donkey and praises the elephant, April 18, 1953
  • 32
  • 1.
  • 16.
  • Marcus Kanuho and Sevier Vaughn review Navajo-Hopi relations, December 8, 1954
  • 33
  • 17.
  • Paul Jones advocates getting "our money's worth on oil" and explains that industry can help the Tribe provide for the needy, October 6, 1955, and January 18, 1956
  • 37
  • 18.
  • Gray Valentine looks at contemporary oil development and remembers past promises, January 19, 1956
  • 39
  • Chapter 2
  • Chee Dodge addresses the problems that would occur with the end of trust status and the division of tribal lands, February 2, 1914
  • Community
  • 49
  • 19.
  • St. Michaels residents petition to the President to add land to the reservation, February 26, 1924
  • 50
  • 20.
  • Greasewood chapter officers ask for a boarding school and Round Rock chapter asks for a day school, April 14, 1932 and March 20, 1939
  • 52
  • 21.
  • Shonto and Lukachukai residents let the Commissioner of Indian Affairs know they need better roads, June 15, 1935 and February 1937
  • 4
  • 54
  • 22.
  • Toadlena chapter officers inform Dr. W.W. Peter that a physician is needed in their community, January 30, 1937
  • 56
  • 23.
  • Kinlichee chapter members request that their Christmas wish be granted, December 25, 1937
  • 57
  • 24.
  • Eastern Navajo area residents doubt the author of the Taylor Grazing Act knows anything about them, n.d.
  • 58
  • 2.
  • 25.
  • Lake Valley Chapter members demand their teacher be fired, July 26, 1940
  • 61
  • 26.
  • Rock Point residents protest the transfer of a range rider, November 18, 1940
  • 63
  • 27.
  • Mariano Lake chapter members present a problem with horses, October 26, 1943
  • 64
  • 28.
  • Chee Dodge writes to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs about Navajo oil resources, March 2, 1923
  • Twin Lakes residents call for the end of the Mexican Springs soil conservation station, November 22, 1943
  • 66
  • 29.
  • Many Farms chapter members argue for the end of livestock reduction until the war is over, November 23, 1943
  • 67
  • Chapter 3
  • Education
  • 77
  • 30.
  • Jacob C. Morgan (Hampton Institute) reports his activities, August 27, 1902
  • 78.
  • Howard Gorman reports to E.R. Fryer on Tom Dodge and Chee Dodge, January 28, 1941
  • 188
  • 79.
  • Robert Martin and other Tribal Council members provide Congress with a list of grievances, April 1946
  • 193
  • 80.
  • Dewey Etsitty and Roger Davis argue the traders must pay more rent, June 26, 1948
  • 195
  • 81.
  • Morgan denies the right of Vice Chairman Howard Gorman to speak during a Tribal Council meeting, May, 15, 1939
  • Ned Hatathli urges the Tribal Council to plan for the future, October 14, 1955
  • 198
  • 82.
  • Annie Wauneka analyzes the job being done by the general counsel, January 23, 1956
  • 200
  • 83.
  • Howard Gorman clarifies the significance of Williams v. Lee, January 13, 1959
  • 202
  • Chapter 6
  • Identity
  • 184
  • 212
  • 84.
  • Chee Dodge warns people about a short rope, November 16, 1905
  • 213
  • 85.
  • Clitso D. Dedman seeks Lorenzo Hubbell's advice, September 9, 1912
  • 214
  • 86.
  • Gehbah Manuelito and Ed Becenti disapprove of Navajo ceremonies, August 18, 1929
  • 214
  • 76.
  • 87.
  • Toadlena schoolchildren explain how a rug is created, how sheep are cared for, and how a hogan is constructed, ca. 1930
  • 216
  • 88.
  • Tom Dodge refutes an inaccurate magazine article about the Navajos, February 25, 1933
  • 219
  • 89.
  • Roy Kinsel, Mattie Denet Dale, John Harvey, Hola Tso, Scott Preston, and David Clark furnish conflicting testimony about peyote, May 9, 1940, and May 15, 1946
  • 222
  • 90.
  • Tsehe Notah talks about the need to plan for our own people, July 5, 1940
  • Navajo Code Talkers use their language and imagination, 1942-1945
  • 230
  • 91.
  • Private Ralph W. Anderson asks for support during World War II, July 3, 1943
  • 233
  • 92.
  • Dan Keyonie reminds John Collier that Navajos are fighting for him, July 10, 1943
  • 234
  • 93.
  • Sam Ahkeah lauds the sacrifices of Navajo soldiers and calls for an end to livestock reduction and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, July 9, 1943
  • 185
  • 235
  • 77.
  • Notah Begay supports a range rider, November 19, 1940
  • 187
Control code
49627634
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
xviii, 275 pages
Isbn
9780826327178
Lccn
2002005684
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Note
Library's copy 1-2 (SW Writers): Purchased, 2015 (Access. No. 2015-026). Forms part of: Marc Simmons Library. With dust jacket.
Other physical details
illustrations, map
System control number
(OCoLC)49627634

Library Locations

    • The Wittliff CollectionsBorrow it
      601 University Drive, 7th Floor, San Marcos, TX, 78666, US
      29.888873 -97.943078
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